Molestation allegations rock prestigious boarding school

MILTON, Mass. — A prestigious boarding and day school near Boston says four former workers engaged in sexual misconduct with several students decades ago.

Milton Academy sent a letter to the school community Tuesday saying an independent investigation determined former theater program head Rey Buono and three other unidentified male workers molested several students.

Buono worked at Milton from 1973 to 1987. He was fired after admitting he molested a student.

The investigation determined Buono abused at least a dozen male students, all minors, and that former headmaster Jerome Pieh had some knowledge of Buono’s misconduct in 1982.

The school says reports have been filed with the appropriate officials and law enforcement agencies.

School officials apologized, saying previous leaders failed to protect their students.

New York Post

Former boarder sues boarding school following sex probe

PHILADELPHIA — An alumna sued a Pennsylvania boarding school Friday, weeks after a grand jury report detailed a half-century of sexual abuse there, accusing the school of ignoring warnings the athletic director was sexually involved with her.

The “Jane Doe” accuser said Solebury School’s permissive atmosphere enabled staff to prey on vulnerable teens. The woman, now 29, said that athletic director Lyle Hazel started grooming her in 10th grade and started a sexual relationship in 12th grade that continued for years and left her unable to finish college.

Indiana Gazette

Notorious paedophile Brian Joseph Spillane sentenced for 16 child sex offences

Serial paedophile and former priest Brian Joseph Spillane​ has been sentenced to another 13 years in jail for abusing young boys, many of whom were homesick and turned to him for help, at a private Catholic boarding school.

Spillane, 74, kept his back turned to his victims and their families as the sentence was handed down in a packed court room in the Downing Centre District Court on Thursday.

The former teacher, chaplain and head of discipline at St Stanislaus’ College, Bathurst, in central west NSW preyed on young boys who came from strictly Catholic families who revered priests.

Spillane used religious rituals, purporting to perform exorcisms, prayers and to speak in tongues, as a ruse to sexually abuse the boys.

After two trials last year, Spillane was found guilty of a total of 16 charges, including sexual assault, indecent assault and buggery, relating to attacks on several boys between 1974 and 1990.

The boys were aged between 12 and 15 and were either boarders or day students at the school.

“He knew that most of these complainants were desperately homesick and offered them comfort only to sexually abuse them,” Judge Robyn Tupman said.

“He knew he could act with impunity and with almost no chance that his behaviour would be revealed.”

The Border Mail (Australia)

Catholic Church paid A$276m to abuse victims in Australia

The Australian Catholic Church has paid A$276m (£171m; $213m) to victims of sexual abuse since 1980, an inquiry has heard.

The money was divided between thousands of victims, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sex Abuse was told.

The data, released on Thursday, showed the average payment was A$91,000.

The landmark royal commission was set up in 2013 and is also investigating abuse at non-religious organisations.

The Catholic Church made the payments in response to 3,066 of 4,445 child sexual abuse claims between 1980 and 2015, the inquiry heard. More than 40% of claims were received by a handful of male orders.

They included compensation, treatment, legal and other costs, said Gail Furness, the lead lawyer assisting the commission in Sydney.

BBC News

How I came to terms with the horrors of my boarding school abuse

Mark Stibbe, a former vicar who lives in North Yorkshire, is among those to claim to have been abused by youth worker John Smyth, who ran Christian holiday camps. As other victims waive their right to anonymity, here he tells his story in full.

iNews

Former Dumbarton boarding school probed in historic child abuse inquiry

A former Dumbarton boarding school is being probed by investigators from the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry.

Judge Lady Smith revealed that the inquiry is investigating whether historical abuse took place at fee-paying Keil School in Kirktonhill.

The boarding school – which closed 17 years ago – will be looked at along with 60 residential care centres as part of the inquiry into widespread abuse in Scotland.

Lady Smith – speaking at a preliminary hearing of the inquiry at the Court of Session in Edinburgh last week – also said that more than 100 locations where abuse is said to have taken place have been identified.

In a statement, she urged anyone with information about abuse to come forward.

Daily Record

Rowing coach jailed for 18 years for sexually abusing 10 boys becomes SIXTH teacher at St Paul’s private schools to be convicted or banned

  • Patrick Marshall is said to have been the head of a ‘clique’ of boys he groomed
  • He was convicted of 25 offences which took place between 1969 and 1981
  • His conviction follows the conviction of five other former teachers at school
  • Another teacher was banned over his behaviour towards a young girl

A former rowing coach has become the fifth member of staff from a top private school to be convicted of child sex offences.

Patrick Marshall, who once taught at the £35,000-per-year St Paul’s School, was found guilty of 24 counts of indecent assault against nine boys and teenagers, and one count of indecency with a child at Southwark Crown Court. He was jailed for 18 years.

The married father-of-three, 70, is the third St Paul’s teacher to be convicted in Operation Winthorpe – the Metropolitan Police investigation into historical sexual abuse at the school. Two others have been convicted under separate investigations.

Daily Mail

Evening Standard (London)

The Times (subscription)

Like John Smyth’s accusers, I bear the scars of a muscular Christian education

The beatings described by victims of John Smyth, endured on Christian summer camps in the late 1970s, are entirely familiar to me. I’m sure the archbishop of Canterbury, as he has said, knew nothing of them when he helped out at those camps as a teenager. But those of us who were victims of similar beatings know this wasn’t simply the activity of a few rotten apples – though rotten apples there were. The problem was deep in the educational philosophy of the public school system, and the poisonous ideas it developed about the sort of men required to run the British empire.

Ted Robertson, the headmaster of my prep school, Hollingbury Court in Sussex, had a collection of canes in his study. Thick ones; thin, whippy ones; long and short. Different materials. For hours I would stand in a gloomy wood-panelled corridor, next to a creepy chapel, waiting for the beatings. This could be several times a week. Talking after lights out, talking at meal times, running in the corridor, wearing the wrong bit of uniform – these and other outrages were all punishable with a good thrashing. “Bend over, boy.” I would focus on a spot on the floor. The most important thing was not to wince. And I wasn’t going to give those bastards the satisfaction of seeing me cry.

Often we would go to bed with underpants drenched in blood. And in the dormitories, named after the headmaster’s military heroes – Drake, Trenchard, Marlborough, Churchill – we would whisper to each other about the sadism and compare the lines on our bums as wounds of pride and solidarity. I was beaten like this throughout the 1970s, with canes and bats and shoes and clothes brushes, from the age of seven all the way through to when I was 12. The pain doesn’t last so long. But a burning anger settles in your soul.

The Guardian

John Smyth allegations: why we need mandatory reporting of all child abuse

A prestigious public school was last night accused of covering up child abuse allegations against a senior Christian barrister later linked to the death of a teenager.

Morality campaigner John Smyth QC was accused by young victims of beating them so violently that they had to wear adult nappies to staunch the bleeding, after he recruited them at a Christian youth camp where the Archbishop of Canterbury once worked.

The alleged four-year campaign of ritualised violence in the late 1970s was reported to the trust which ran the camps for pupils from some of Britain’s leading public schools – but appears not to have been reported to police for more than three decades.

Winchester College said it banned Smyth, 75, from contact with its pupils in 1982 but did not go to police in order to spare his alleged victims from ‘further trauma’.

Meanwhile, Smyth moved to Zimbabwe, where he was alleged to have continued his violent abuse of children at more summer camps. He was also reportedly accused of culpable homicide over the death of a 16-year-old boy, Guide Nyachuru, who was found naked in a school pool, but the prosecution was dropped.

The married father of four – who once worked with campaigner Mary Whitehouse – has refused to respond to accusations he abused 22 boys and young men in Britain in attacks of escalating violence which drove one to attempt suicide.

Daily Mail

USA: the dangers of boarding at a “progressive” school

Report: Officials hid decades of sex abuse at boarding school

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – A grand jury report issued Wednesday found that teachers at a Bucks County boarding school sexually preyed on children for half a century while administrators turned a blind eye.

No charges were expected, mostly because the crimes alleged at the culturally progressive Solebury School in New Hope occurred too long ago.

Bucks County District Attorney Matthew Weintraub compared preying on children at the $55,000-a-year school to “fishing in a barrel” under previous leaders and said they were willfully blind to the situation. One complaint still could be prosecuted before the legal deadline, but the 27-year-old accuser does not want to press charges, Weintraub said.

The report describes nine teachers or officials who engaged in sexual relationships with students at the school from the 1950s through 2005. School leaders repeatedly failed to report the alleged sexual abuse to police or child welfare officials, the report said.

They also failed to discipline the abusers or enforce boundaries at the 90-acre campus, which was described as having a relaxed environment in which students and teachers called each other by their first names, socialized together and sometimes formed close friendships. Some of the perpetrators are dead, and the statute of limitations has run on the other alleged incidents, but Weintraub hopes the report will “expose how these crimes were allowed to occur and how they were concealed for so long.”

“This was child predation under the guise of progressive education. It’s unconscionable,” the prosecutor said.

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