Sussex music teacher banned over sexual relationships with pupils

A music teacher has been banned “indefinitely” from the classroom after striking up “disturbing” relationships with two pupils.

Nathan Waring, 37, “developed an inappropriate relationship” with a 12 year old while working at a boarding prep school in Eastbourne.

Despite warnings, his conduct continued towards a second girl when he took up a job at a boarding school in Norfolk.

A misconduct panel concluded that Mr Waring “showed no remorse“.

The hearing, led by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL), found Mr Waring struck up a relationship with a girl – known as Pupil A – while working at St Bede’s Prep in Eastbourne, between 2004 and 2007.

He sent text messages of a sexual nature and kissed and touched her inappropriately, the NCTL panel heard.

BBC News

The Mirror

Heart-warming documentary School Life to get UK release from 13 October

Magnolia Pictures and Soilsiú Films productions have announced that Irish feature documentary School Life, co-directed by Neasa Ní Chianáin and David Rane, will be released into UK cinemas from 13th October on the back of a successful and critically acclaimed release in Ireland and the US. The film was an audience favourite at Sundance Film Festival this year.

School Life has received critical acclaim from leading international critics including: “Without a doubt, viewers will recognize a beloved figure from their own school years in the ageing and endearingly oddball teachers”, Fionnuala Halligan, Screen Daily; “Irresistibly charming,” Huffington Post; “A delightful crowd-pleaser. An irresistibly admiring portrait,” Neil Young, Hollywood Reporter and “Finds poetry in the raw nature of education. The most adorable documentary that Frederick Wiseman never made,” David Ehrlich, Indiewire.

A funny and yet poignant observational documentary, School Life follows two primary school teachers, John and Amanda Leyden, who have become legends teaching Reading, ‘Rithmetic and Rock ‘n’ Roll to young pupils at Headfort, an enchanting 18th Century Hogwarts-like boarding school – the last of its kind in Ireland.

The pace at the school is hectic and the mood infectious as this eccentric, chain-smoking, and very droll British couple, who have lived and taught for 46 years at Headfort, work their magic in hilarious fashion on fertile young minds. The film reflects a unique kind of warmth and fondness that existed between tutor and ward in years gone by, a genuine love of all that makes childhood so precious. But, in School Life, for both the pupils, moving on from the last days of their childhood, and the teachers, facing the end of their careers, leaving is the hardest lesson to learn.

School Life (previously known as In Loco Parentis) is produced by Soilsíu and financed by the Irish Film Board, the Broadcast Authority of Ireland, RTÉ, TVE, and Creative Europe.

Government mulls setting minimum boarding school age as part of reforms

But it is not the UK or devolved governments…

By SIMON NDONGA, NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 14 – The Ministry of Education is mulling setting a minimum age at which parents will be allowed to enroll their children in boarding school.

Speaking at the requiem mass for the nine girls killed in a fire at the Moi Girls School, Education Principal Secretary Belio Kipsang said they should be competent enough to handle themselves in case of emergency.

At what age do we allow our children to be in boarding schools? This may affect our primary schools because we would want to be sure that when our children are in boarding schools at primary school level, they are of such an age that in case of challenges they  can be able to take care of themselves,” he told mourners.

Kipsang described the tragic loss of life in the Moi Girls fire as heart breaking as it is something that could have been prevented.

Capital News (Kenya)

First state-funded primary boarding school in the east of England

Sad news, that with all the evidence of harm from early boarding, the Sapientia Education Trust (SET) (of which Wymondham College is the founding school) has decided to open an early state boarding facility.

In April this year, SET was granted permission (by the Department for Education) to open the Sapientia Primary Prep School as part of a wave of 111 free schools around the country.

The school, for five to 11-year-olds, will create 450 places, 30 of which will be boarding, making it the first state-funded primary boarding school in the east of England.

Eastern Daily Press

Someone needs to add Boarding School Syndrome into the mix…

At an event last week called “The Dark Side of Business,” held at the Corinthia Hotel in London, neuroscientist Tara Swart spoke about why psychopathic traits were so common in high-powered people.

She said many signs of psychopathy were also synonymous with those of strong leadership, such as callousness, impulsivity, aggression, and showing little emotion.

With more men in CEO positions than women, Swart says, boardrooms are severely lacking female characteristics such as empathy, intuition, and creativity. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule, and Swart acknowledged that some women were bad at empathy and some men were good at it — but as a general rule, she said, these tend to be female traits.

[…]

Some of Swart’s male clients were sent off to boarding school at a young age and had horrible experiences of bullying, institutionalised violence, and humiliation. But women experience these things too.

Business Insider asked whether the ways men and women coped with these feelings of shame and rejection had an impact on more men ending up with psychopathic traits.

[But no mention of Boarding School Syndrome?]

Business Insider

Irish boarding documentary gets new title for USA market

When I occasionally get to see a documentary about education in another country, I have a natural tendency to assume that the work is somewhat representative of the traditions and quirks of schooling in that country. It’s not necessarily true, of course.

And then I wonder which documentary about U.S. education would be most representative of K-12 schooling here to a foreign audience. One of the many about schools in tough urban neighborhoods? One about competition to get into oversubscribed charter schools? There are so many, about so many diverse aspects of education here, that it would be hard to pick one that was truly representative.

So what is one to make of a documentary about a private boarding school in Ireland that is full of quirky characters?

School Life” is a 100-minute film by Neasa Ní Chianáin, an Irish documentarian whose first acclaimed work was about an asylum. (“School Life” was evidently titled “In Loco Parentis” before being changed.)

Education Week

Why Mum packed Dad away inside a suitcase

There were things about my early childhood that I did not understand. I accepted, but did not really question. I knew the bare bones: that my father had died in the war and that, to enable her to pursue her career in the documentary film industry, my mother sent me to a boarding school when I was nearly three. And I knew that she had married my stepfather in 1947, but it wasn’t until four years later, when I was 10 and she was pregnant with my half-brother, that I finally came home for good to lead a family life.

My childhood before that was a bit unorthodox and rootless, but not unhappy. The schools I went to were well chosen, caring and liberal. I remember long, golden summers on the Sussex Downs spent with friends of my mother and filled with fun and kindness. My paternal grandmother, who often looked after me, was always loving and welcoming – with buttons to sort and cakes for tea.

The Guardian

Gordonstoun school asks former pupils if they were abused

A leading private school with links to the royal family has contacted more than 3,000 former pupils asking them to report evidence of abuse they may have suffered during their time there.

Allegations of historical abuse at Gordonstoun junior school emerged two years ago.

Prince Charles is a former pupil at the boarding school, near Lossiemouth in Moray, and disliked his time there so much he described it as being like “Colditz in kilts”.

It is one of a number of independent schools in Scotland named by Lady Smith, the judge who is conducting a national inquiry into historical abuse in the country.

The Times (subscription)

MI6 and early boarding: A moment that changed me: finding out at 15 that Dad was a spy

[…]

The Firm, as Dad called it, knew that agents’ children were a liability so they dangled the carrot of free private boarding school in front of them to keep us out of the picture. Mum and Dad were the first generation in my family not to go down the mines or become skivvies, they knew what lay behind them. My parents were desperate that their offspring should come to see themselves as confident, entitled, well-educated and to have social capital and opportunities that had never been extended to them. The upper-class MI6 leadership was made up of people my father respected and wanted to emulate.

The state exploited this longing and so my brothers were shipped away at six and seven years old, never to return. Later – until I managed to escape – I spent a year in what was essentially a prison for posh children. A growing body of evidence has shown that these institutions inflict deep psychological wounds, and this has indeed been my lasting experience. My eldest brother died at 24, and I wonder whether things would have been different for him had he been allowed to stay at home. I now understand that my childhood and family were shaped by state intrusion and secrecy.

The Guardian

Headmaster of Windsor prep school sentenced

A veteran teacher who retired four years ago has escaped prison for sexually assaulting a 12-year-old pupil at prestigious St George’s School at Windsor Castle two decades ago.

Latin teacher Anthony Brailsford, now 70, was briefly acting headteacher at the boarding prep school in 1993.

He committed the offences in 1997 and 1998.

On 13 Jan, he was given a six months suspended prison sentence by Judge Mr Recorder Christopher Quinlan QC at Reading Crown Court.

Windsor Observer

Daily Mail