Sussex music teacher banned over sexual relationships with pupils

A music teacher has been banned “indefinitely” from the classroom after striking up “disturbing” relationships with two pupils.

Nathan Waring, 37, “developed an inappropriate relationship” with a 12 year old while working at a boarding prep school in Eastbourne.

Despite warnings, his conduct continued towards a second girl when he took up a job at a boarding school in Norfolk.

A misconduct panel concluded that Mr Waring “showed no remorse“.

The hearing, led by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL), found Mr Waring struck up a relationship with a girl – known as Pupil A – while working at St Bede’s Prep in Eastbourne, between 2004 and 2007.

He sent text messages of a sexual nature and kissed and touched her inappropriately, the NCTL panel heard.

BBC News

The Mirror

Heart-warming documentary School Life to get UK release from 13 October

Magnolia Pictures and Soilsiú Films productions have announced that Irish feature documentary School Life, co-directed by Neasa Ní Chianáin and David Rane, will be released into UK cinemas from 13th October on the back of a successful and critically acclaimed release in Ireland and the US. The film was an audience favourite at Sundance Film Festival this year.

School Life has received critical acclaim from leading international critics including: “Without a doubt, viewers will recognize a beloved figure from their own school years in the ageing and endearingly oddball teachers”, Fionnuala Halligan, Screen Daily; “Irresistibly charming,” Huffington Post; “A delightful crowd-pleaser. An irresistibly admiring portrait,” Neil Young, Hollywood Reporter and “Finds poetry in the raw nature of education. The most adorable documentary that Frederick Wiseman never made,” David Ehrlich, Indiewire.

A funny and yet poignant observational documentary, School Life follows two primary school teachers, John and Amanda Leyden, who have become legends teaching Reading, ‘Rithmetic and Rock ‘n’ Roll to young pupils at Headfort, an enchanting 18th Century Hogwarts-like boarding school – the last of its kind in Ireland.

The pace at the school is hectic and the mood infectious as this eccentric, chain-smoking, and very droll British couple, who have lived and taught for 46 years at Headfort, work their magic in hilarious fashion on fertile young minds. The film reflects a unique kind of warmth and fondness that existed between tutor and ward in years gone by, a genuine love of all that makes childhood so precious. But, in School Life, for both the pupils, moving on from the last days of their childhood, and the teachers, facing the end of their careers, leaving is the hardest lesson to learn.

School Life (previously known as In Loco Parentis) is produced by Soilsíu and financed by the Irish Film Board, the Broadcast Authority of Ireland, RTÉ, TVE, and Creative Europe.

Anthony Horowitz: ‘People used to disagree. Now they send death threats’

He had a privileged upbringing but then his family lost everything. As he takes his biggest risk yet, the writer talks about surviving his childhood – and the storm he caused about writing black characters

Being packed off to boarding school at the age of eight could have been an escape. But this was the 1960s, when beatings were a way of life in such schools. At Orley Farm in Harrow, Horowitz was often left bleeding after six of the best. He worries that remembering such things sounds like whingeing, when other children lived in dire poverty. But, as the patron of the anti-bullying charity Kidscape, he says: “Emotional cruelty ignores wealth and position.” Such vicious treatment of children in boarding schools in the 60s, he believes, has had a detrimental impact on society. “It is why so much of this country is dysfunctional.”

It was not just the beatings that scarred the writer: being plump and Jewish made him an easy target for other boys. At night, he escaped by telling stories to schoolmates after lights out in his dorm. In those tales, he found salvation and developed an ambition to be a writer. It is clearly painful to recall. Why does he talk about it? “For one very simple reason,” he snaps back, with barely concealed irritation. “People like yourself always ask about it.

The Guardian

Eurasian who went to British boarding school breaks his silence over abuse

How a Chinese mother’s dream of an English education for her son placed him at the mercy of a tyrannical ‘discipline master’, who was accused of both physical and sexual abuse during his time at the Grace Dieu Manor House, in England

Next month, thousands of Chinese children from Hong Kong and the mainland will head off or return to boarding schools in Britain for a prized education, but it was not always so.

When I arrived at my English prep school in 1953, having been raised in Shanghai and Bangkok, I was the only Eurasian out of the 100 or so boys at Grace Dieu Manor House, in the Leicestershire country­side. Asians would remain a rare sight at the school for a few decades more, until I was followed by a stream of Hong Kong Chinese in the run-up to the handover of the British colony to China, in 1997.

South China Morning Post Magazine

Irish boarding documentary gets new title for USA market

When I occasionally get to see a documentary about education in another country, I have a natural tendency to assume that the work is somewhat representative of the traditions and quirks of schooling in that country. It’s not necessarily true, of course.

And then I wonder which documentary about U.S. education would be most representative of K-12 schooling here to a foreign audience. One of the many about schools in tough urban neighborhoods? One about competition to get into oversubscribed charter schools? There are so many, about so many diverse aspects of education here, that it would be hard to pick one that was truly representative.

So what is one to make of a documentary about a private boarding school in Ireland that is full of quirky characters?

School Life” is a 100-minute film by Neasa Ní Chianáin, an Irish documentarian whose first acclaimed work was about an asylum. (“School Life” was evidently titled “In Loco Parentis” before being changed.)

Education Week

Benedictines ‘can’t accept’ blame for child abuse at boarding school

The head of a religious order has expressed “sorrow” that monks abused boys at Fort Augustus Abbey School but said his congregation cannot be held responsible for what happened.

Dom Richard Yeo, abbot president of the English Benedictine Congregation, said he believed the allegations of former residents who say they were abused at the fee-paying Highland boarding school, which closed in 1993. But the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry was shown a submission from the congregation which said it had “no remit or authority” to acknowledge or accept abuse. The inquiry heard allegations have been made against six monks who taught at either Fort Augustus, on the banks of Loch Ness, or Carlekemp Priory School in East Lothian.

The Scotsman

Gordonstoun school asks former pupils if they were abused

A leading private school with links to the royal family has contacted more than 3,000 former pupils asking them to report evidence of abuse they may have suffered during their time there.

Allegations of historical abuse at Gordonstoun junior school emerged two years ago.

Prince Charles is a former pupil at the boarding school, near Lossiemouth in Moray, and disliked his time there so much he described it as being like “Colditz in kilts”.

It is one of a number of independent schools in Scotland named by Lady Smith, the judge who is conducting a national inquiry into historical abuse in the country.

The Times (subscription)

Headmaster of Windsor prep school sentenced

A veteran teacher who retired four years ago has escaped prison for sexually assaulting a 12-year-old pupil at prestigious St George’s School at Windsor Castle two decades ago.

Latin teacher Anthony Brailsford, now 70, was briefly acting headteacher at the boarding prep school in 1993.

He committed the offences in 1997 and 1998.

On 13 Jan, he was given a six months suspended prison sentence by Judge Mr Recorder Christopher Quinlan QC at Reading Crown Court.

Windsor Observer

Daily Mail

Boarding school teacher who sexually abused a boy, nine, 60 years ago is jailed for four years

A former children’s television presenter has been jailed for sexually assaulting a young boy almost 60 years ago.

Former Jackanory storyteller John Earle admitted indecently assaulting the boy from when he was nine years old.

Earle, 87, was a teacher at a school in Okehampton, Devon, when he carried out the assaults between 1957 and 1961.

His victim Iain Peters, now aged 69, said the historic abuse had “blighted his life”.

He was jailed for four years and will sign the sex offenders register.

Earle admitted six counts of indecent assault on the boy while working as deputy head teacher at Upcott House Preparatory School.

BBC News

Daily Mail

C4 News

The Tunbridge Wells headmaster of an ‘excellent’ rated school says it is not a ‘pushy hot house’

A headmaster has tried to reassure parents his Tunbridge Wells school is not apushy hot house” after it was rated “excellent” in all areas in its latest inspection.

Holmewood House School is a private day and boarding school for boys and girls aged 3 to 13 in Langton Green led by James Marjoribanks.

It was awarded the Independent Schools Inspectorate’s top rating for both “the achievement of pupils, including their academic development” and “the personal development of pupils”.

Kent Live